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U.s. 67, Libya 43, Us 31, Gadhafi 30, Randi 15, Tripoli 9, Donald Trump 8, Cnn 8, Syria 8, Tokyo 7, Moammar Gadhafi 7, Pentagon 6, Japan 5, Nato 5, Cairo 4, Benghazi 4, Downtown Cairo 4, Egypt 4, America 4, Chris Lawrence 4,
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  CNN    CNN Newsroom    News/Business. New.  

    March 22, 2011
    1:00 - 3:00pm EDT  

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the routine. their communication so instinctive that they sometimes understand each other just by making eye contact. we didn't witness them finding survivors in japan, but the dogs serve another purpose for those who have lost everything. >> having the dog and seeing the times that the people in haiti or something would enjoy a little solace from the dog, that's also part of their job and helpful to everybody, to teammates and myself alike. >> reporter: all these dogs actually live with their handlers who are heavily involved in their training. that helps solidify the bond between them and helps them get through these long deployments a long way from home. brian todd, cnn, japan. cnn "newsroom" continues rite now with randi kaye in for ali velshi. much news to tell you about today. allied air strikes are still inflicting damage on the military assets of moammar gadhafi in libya but not without a cost. you're looking at the wreckage of a u.s. f-15 that crashed today in rebel-held eastern
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libya, for reasons the u.s. military says were mechanical, not hostile. i will say that again for you. the u.s. says the plane had equipment problems and was not shot down. the two-man crew jekted and the pilot was recovered quickly. the weapons officer was found by rebels and americans reached him. neither badly hurt. back in tripoli, reporters saw the results of a missile landing on a port. we also have remarkable pictures from misrata, a city down the coast that gadhafi forces have bombarded for days. this is amateur video uploaded to youtube yesterday. now, we can't confirm when or where it was shot, but we do know misrata's main hospital
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reports 77 deaths since sunday. the u.n.-approved campaign to protect libyan civilians began saturday and it's still not clear who will actually end up in charge. arab states don't want to work for nato and u.s. has other campaigns to worry about. nato says it will enforce a libyan arms embarge go the in meantime. let's bring in diana magnay, she's on the "uss keer sauj." nic reportson is here from tripoli. tell us what you saw at this port, nic. >> reporter: well, it was a naval facility. we were taken to some warehouses that had sort of the thin tin roofing that you have on large, big warehouse facilities. and inside we were shown four mobile rocket launcher systems, each capable of carrying two rockets, the sort of thing that you can tilt up and swivel around to shoot in any direction. the trucks were about 30 foot or
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so long, and all four of them parked close together inside this facility, have been targeted and hit by either a missile or a bomb that had fallen right behind them underneath the tin roof and ripped them apart, destroyed them. we couldn't see any rockets inside them. there were rockets elsewhere in the warehouse. government officials told us that this was just a repair and training facility. it was clear that some equipment had been dragged away from there before we arrived, but it appeared to us to be very much a military facility. and i think that shows you something about the impact of coalition strikes here in tripoli. the government really is only able to show us strikes that have some military significance. they've not been able to back up their claims that hospitals and schools have been hit and civilians wounded. it doesn't seem to exist. they can't show that to us. what we saw today was clearly a military target in the naval port facility here being hit,
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randi. >> now it's after 7:00 p.m. in tripoli. do you see any new signs of bombing runs or any more antiaircraft fire? >> reporter: we just had a little bit of heavy machine gun fire probably not antiaircraft fire in the distance a little bit. but nothing yet. nothing on the scale of what we saw last night. generally that antiaircraft gunfire starts after a couple of missiles or bombs have landed close by. we haven't heard anything like that so far randi. >> how is the gadhafi regime holding up? are there any new signs at this hour that he seems to be cracking? >> reporter: no, not from what we hear from the leadership in the regime. they all seem to speak with the same voice, that nothing's going to change, gadhafi is not going to back down, there's no chance of a sort of military coup and
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toppling him. what's interesting, when we went to see this port facility today, there were a lot of libyans coming out along the sea coast road there to take a look from a distance to see -- >> nic robertson there reporting from tripoli. let's get to diana magnay. she's on the ship carrying the injured pilot. diana, can you tell us a little bit about how this rescue took place? >> reporter: just one pilot, the pilot, on board this ship. he was rescued by really quite a big operation. it's called a trap unlt. that's sort of a special unit of marines who went out last night in two aus pri aircraft, a mix between sort of a helicopter that can launch off a ship like this one and then two support super stallion helicopter. they flew over, the marines went
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on the ground to rescue the one pilot, but they weren't able to pick up the other crew member, the weapons officer, in that mission, because when the pilots ejected they ejected and landed in separate places. so we know the weapons officer was looked after by rebel forces for a period of time, but he is now in american hands. and as far as the pilot is concerned, he is in good condition. when he arrived here on this vessel, he walked into the medical facility. they have extensive medical facilities on board this ship. so both men are in good condition, both men in american hands, and one of them on board this ship. >> that is very good news and certainly that the rebel forces there helped rescue that weapons officer as well. diana magnay, thank you. it is just after 2:00 a.m. wednesday in japan. workers at the fukushima plant finally have something to celebrate. the crisis is by no means over. but they managed to restore electricity to the control room
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of the number three reactors, one of four that's been devastated by explosions, fires or both. and electricity of course means a lot, you can power water pu pumps, lights ventilation and monitoring systems. crews are still spraying water on reactors three and four and scientists are still testing water, air and soil for miles around. we've told you about the bans on local milk and produce. well, today high levels of radioactive iodine and cesium were found in soil sam ps 25 miles from the plant. the official death toll from japan's earthquake and tsunami stands at 9,080 with more than 13,000 missing. one of those in one category or the other is a grandfather who thought he'd be safe in his own bedroom. cnn's gary tuchman met his family. >> reporter: sugai lost her bridal shop when the tsunami hit her home of kauts katsunuma,
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japan. that's because she doesn't know her father's whereabouts. >> translator: maybe he's home. >> reporter: her mother evacuated but her father said he would be safe on the second floor of his home. so he stayed behind. so why doesn't shikako know if he survived? >> translator: there's no way to get there. >> reporter: incredibly, this part of the city has been so utterly pulverized, it's impenetrable. firefighters could not goat to the house to search for her father. we couldn't believe there wasn't some way to get there so shikako's son starts to walk with us toward the neighborhood so perhaps we could all find out what happened to his grandfather. but as the size and scope of the wreckage got more intense, he went look looking for fi firefighters who could help and we continued the journey. we were still nowhere near the house when we made the discovery. the carnage we're seeing is
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horrifying. the number on the missing list is very high. one of the missing is in the back seat of this car. we see the body of a man who apparently drown. we saw firefighters combing wreckage and we notified them so soldiers could remove the body. we also told them what we're trying to do. but the firefighters were not able to find a way to get there eench. 48 hours have now gone by since we first arrived. we saw firefighters have cut a path. we can walk through this muddy swamp and we think we'll be able to get to the house. and then we see it. the home is a half mile from where it used to be. the first floor is destroyed. but the second floor is intact. however, there is no sign of human life. no sign of satsuo sato. >> if he did stay here, it looks he could have survived. the linens and the few fu tons still in place. here a picture. the grandson is in the picture. we don't know what happened to his grandfather.
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shikako had been informed by authorities that her father was not in the house. we retrieved sentimental mementos from his home. she told us -- >> translator: others have been found. survivors have been in the news so i still have some hope. >> reporter: satsuo sato is now among many names on the list of the missing. gary tuchman, cnn, katsunuma, japan. donald trump talks to us about his ties to moammar gadhafi. you'll want to hear what he has to say. we want to know what you have to say about the u.s. involvement in libya. send us your thoughts. here's how to reach us at twitter, facebook and our blog. we'll read your responses later in the show so be sure to stay tuned. [ male announcer ] springtime belongs to the doers. those of us who know grass doesn't turn green
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believe it or not, donald trump has a link to moammar gadhafi. trump once leased land to the libyan leader. so what happened to the money that exchanged hands? cnnmoney.com's poppy harlow joins me from new york. poppy, tell us about these business dealings. >> sure. we know that donald trump does business with people all around the world, but i have to say, randi, i was a bit surprised when we sat down yesterday to hear about the specifics of this land deal he did with moammar gadhafi here in new york. i'll let you listen to him explain that and then take a very close listen to what he says he did with the money from gadhafi. take a listen. >> i deal with everybody, and i like that. what did i do with gadhafi?
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i leased him a piece of land for his tent. he paid me more than i get in a whole year. and then he wasn't able to use the piece of land. so people would say, did i take advantage? did i this? so i got in one night more money than i would have gotten all year for this piece of land up in westchester, and then didn't let him use it. that's called being intelligent. >> do you still have the money that gadhafi paid you? >> you're not talking that kind of money. do i still have it? what does that mean? >> what happened to it? some celebrities performed for gadhafi gave the money to charity. >> sure. i give tremendous amount to charity. i ga in fact, i said when i did it, i'm going to take gadhafi's money and i'm not going to make it easy on him and i'm going to give the money to charity. and that's exactly what i did. >> so, randi, donald trump making it very clear that he
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didn't keep that money, but interesting, we've seen celebrities like beyonce and others who performed for gadhafi, and there's been controversy over who's given the money back or not. donald trump making it clear there he did not hang on to that money, randi. >> i'm still stuck on gadhafi looking to buy land in westchester. >> he was renting land to pitch aif tent around the u.n. general assembly. still shocking. >> yes. tell me whether or not trump said anything about running for president. >> we of course doesed him the question. you know, you look at the polls reecently and trump is up there. some of the nay sayers need to pay attention to the numbers because donald trump is seriously considering a bid for the white house. here's what he told us. >> well, i'll make a decision sometime prior to june, and if i make a decision to run, i will fight very hard for the office and i will fight very hard for the country. >> which way are you leaning right knonow? >> i can't tell you that. but i can say this, i love the country, i want the country to
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succeed and with proper leadership it can succeed. >> randi, you heard him say proper leadership. he was critical of congress and the obama administration saying he doesn't think they're, quote, very mart. he said, we need smarter leadership. he said the economy is not recovering, this is a fall recovery and he hates the position america is in right now. like or dislike him, donald trump has some clear beliefs here and he says this potential run for the presidency is a much more serious one than back in 1899 when there was a lot of attention around it as well. we'll wait and see. he said to me the decision will come likely before june. randi? >> and the entire interview, because that really leaves people wanting more, can we see that anywhere? >> we've got it posted on cnnmoney.com. he talked about all the oil in iraq, what we should do with our wars, opec. a lot more from donald trump online. so is another volatile week unfolding for world financial markets with the ongoing crises
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in the middle east, north africa and japan? the one and only richard quest joins us to talk about all of that, next. that you need to do for your heart health. for me, it means an aspirin regimen. before you begin an aspirin regimen. speak to your doctor. about his future. he can't say social security... much less tell you what it means. he doesn't know that his parents are counting on the money they pay in. or that the hard earned benefits his grandparents receive... are secure. right now he's not thinking about his future. but we are. aarp has been working to preserve social security for more than 50 years. join us in a conversation to strengthen it for years to come.
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how are international markets handling the ongoing crises in the middle east, japan and north africa? richard quest joins us. it's been a wild couple of months from the uprising in egypt, through the bombings in libya this week. so how is all of this affecting
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the international markets? >> i think the core point that you always need to remember when you talk about markets is the ease. when you look at the events taking place, in egypt, tunisia, now what's happening in libya, they all create the absolute uncertainty that investors shy away from. of course there are the contrarians that like to bet against every event that takes place. for instance, in japan we've seen a dramatic reduction in stock values. the nikkei has fallen very sharply. but, randi, even that has now started to come back. it takes nerves of seteel in ths particular market. volatility, randi, is the order of the day. >> but a lot of people of course are wondering about the long-term effects if news in all of these regions continue.
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>> yes. and they would be right to because, again, it's that uncertainty and fragility in your 401(k) plan gets hit, your iras get hit. just about any form of investment you have gets hit. and that's the object in a game like this, the wealth preservation. but let's just take the price of oil, for example. i know, for example, at over $100 a barrel oil is exceptionally volatile in the united states at the moment. certainly we're at a price per gallon headed toward $4 and beyond. and this graph shows exactly why this is a situation people are going to have to learn to live with. even more so as the summer driving season comes along. americans are going to have to expect to pay more at the pump or, at the very least, randi, they won't be paying less. and that takings a toll on economic growth, on business, and on ordinary men and women driving. >> yeah. this is the time when certainly
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a lot of people are taking their summer vacations so they're watching that graph that you just had up there very closely. what about this talk of at&t purchasing t-mobile? is that having an impact on the markets? >> you know, if i had a ship's bell and a whistle, i would make a loud noise. i mean, that's exactly the sort of thing the market loves. i haven't got my normal quest means business bell to ding for you. they loved it. mergers, acquisitions, deals being done. why? fees are being earned. growth is being created. think of it as a cake that is baking bigger and bigger. of course there are some who may lose jobs. there will be problems on the way. but anytime wall street sniffs a deal being made, to mix my metaphors, we're off to the races. >> richard, only you can make a conversation about the international markets that much fun. oh, there you go! you got it.
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that was fun and informative as well. thank you, richard. see you soon. >> thank you. >> be sure to join christine romans for "your bottom line" every saturday and "your money" saturdays and sundays. checking the time right now, 22 minutes past the hour. here's some other top stories. a u.s. air force fighter jet crashed in libya today. u.s. officials said it went down because of an equipment malfunction, not enemy fire. officials say both crew members, a pilot and weapons officer, ejected from the f-15 strike eagle and were rescued and are safely out of libya. in japan, workers have restored electricity to the control room of the number three reactor at that damage nuclear power plant. they sprayed water on the housing of reactor number three for about 50 minutes today and plan to spray reactor number four for several hours as well as they work to cool the nuclear fuel and restore electricity throughout the plant. a huge fire broke out
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earlier today at the egyptian interior ministry building in cairo. it started after thousands of ministry workers and policemen staged a protest there to demand better working conditions. protestors denied setting that fire. more than $1 million per missile, the cost of operations over libya are piling up. but how much is the u.s. really expecting to spend? that's next. slap! slap! slap! ] ow, ow! [ male announcer ] your favorite foods fighting you? fight back fast with tums. calcium rich tums goes to work in seconds. nothing works faster. ♪ tum ta tum tum tums nothing works faster. thbe pt delicious gourmet gravy. and she agrees. wi fcyest gravy lovers, uratannjoy the delicious, satisfying taste grmet gravy every day. fay as the best ingredient is love. [ male announcer ] ten people are going to win the chevrolet, buick, gmc or cadillac of their choice. push your onstar button and you could be one of them.
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welcome back. we have gotten plenty of comments on our blog about the u.s. involvement in libya, and one common theme is the cost. so how much is the u.s. spending on operation odyssey dawn? let's bring in cnn pentagon correspondent chris lawrence. chris, good to see you. what do we know about the cost so far? >> reporter: well, we know it's high. that's for sure. and we know that right now it's getting paid for out of sort of this general fund but that eventually it's going to take a bite out of the budget if this mission keeps going on for a sustainable amount of time. take a look at what we mean. imposing a no-fly zone, it sounds simple. take a look at the cost there to impose just a limited no-fly zone, which is what the u.s. and
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its partners have done. you're talking about just the northern part of the country, around from benghazi to tripoli. even the cost of that is $32 million to $100 million a week. why does it cost so much? take a look at what's volved. you're talking about an initial barrage of 24 to 48 hours of massive amounts of tomahawk missiles. to date, about 160 of them have been fired. well, those tomahawks, according to the u.s. navy, with everything included, cost about 1.4 milli$1.4 million each. even if the u.s. didn't shoot them all -- we know the british shot some of them -- say we shot 130 of them, we're still talking about $182 million for the tomahawks that have been fired so far. and when you look at what comes after the tomahawks, fighter jets, b-2 bombers, the cost of an f-15 in the air for an hour, all told, about $10,000 an hour.
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so when you see these stories about these sorties that are being flown with all of these planes flying for hours an hours, you can quickly see how you'd get up into the $50 million, $80 million, $100 million range. >> in term of all of these costs, we've already paid for a lot of this and then we'll have to replace it when we replace the missiles? >> true. it's hard to put a price tag on what it costs for a ship to operate in the mediterranean because the ship would have been out there anyway. but certain things like a tomahawk missile, the navy usually buys a couple hundred a year. but if you're shooting off a couple hundred in just a matter of a week or two weeks, then those are going to have to get replenished at some point. at some point down the line, if this goes on, you're going to have to see it be accounted for in the budget. >> all right, chris lawrence. thank you. very interesting numbers, big
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numbers. this scene out of cairo today, a peaceful protest but things gots really heated at egypt's interior ministry as you can see there. the details about what exactly happened, next.
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here's a look at some stories developing right now in news you may have missed. the u.s. military says an american fighter jet crashed in libya today due to milkal problems. you can see there the burnt remains of the f-15. both crew members ejected but were separated. the u.s. military picked up the pilot while anti-gadhafi forces picked up the weapons officer. they suffered minor injuries and are safely back with the u.s. military. more unsettling details in japan as its nuclear crisis
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deepens. more smoke spewed from reactors two and three at fukushima nuclear power plant, but the main concern today shifts now to reactors one and two. tokyo electric's president says the damage to those two reactors is worse than they thought. seawater pumped to cool the reactors has been corroding and danching the components and repairs will take longer than they first thought. on a positive note, though, technicians were able to restore power to the control room in reactor three, which has been a top priority for nuclear workers. a dramatic scene in downtown cairo. that is the egyptian interior ministry building following a protest earlier today. you can see flames on the roof and massive plumes of smoke. people were seen running from the building. just before the fire broke out, thousands of ministry employees were protesting for higher wages. protestors deny starting the fire. one of the greatest players in the nfl will now be known as a registered sex offender. lawrence taylor pleaded guilty to charges related to sex with
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an underage prostitute last may. the nfl hall of fame linebacker was sentenced today to six years probation and fined $2,000. another sports legend is in court, barry bonds. federal prosecutors began laying out their case today against the baseball legend in san francisco. propers say bonds lied to a grand jury in 2003 when he said he did not know his trainer was giving him illegal steroids. several former team mitts are scheduled to testify against the home run king. our dr. sanjay gupta is back from japan. what he thinks about the radiation threat, next. wrench? wrench.
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9,080 people are now confirmed dead in japan, more than 13,000 others are still missing more than a week and a half after the earthquake and tsunami. there are lingering concerns about radiation from the troubled fukushima nuclear power plant. our chief medical correspondent dr. sanjay gupta has just returned from covering the crisis. >> there's no question there's going to be concerns about radiation, randi. i will tell you, as much as we're talking about this today and over the last week, those concerns about radiation will be there for a long time to come. in part because of the huge amount of cleanup, the huge amount of concerns regarding contamination specifically around the fukushima plant. so this is something we've seen
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in the past, obviously, with three mile island and also what happened around chernobyl. the larger question and question we're starting to get a better answer about is the impact overall on human health. certainly from direct exposure to radiation and also from potential contamination of food. with regard to direct exposure, there have been a lot of levels measured around the fukushima daiichi plant. no question the levels are much, much higher than normal in the immediate vicinity ever the plant. but outside of the evacuation zone, the levels have not approached at any time a level high enough, according to measurements, to have an impact on human health, even as far away as tokyo, the levels have been 20 times normal but still much lower than would cause any impact on human health. larger concerns this morning about food, specifically food such as vegetables like spinach for radioactive particles may be able to settle on spinach. we hear 100 kilometers away
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there's evidence of the particles on spinach and also in milk. think of it like this, the grass eaten by cows, subsequently those cows make milk, radioactive iodine can be concentrated in the milk. we saw that after chernobyl and those will be persistent concerns. again, how much of an impact on human health? that's unclear, but as one person said, you'd have to eat spinach almost every day from one of these areas to essentially get the same amount of radiation equivalent in one cat scan. so not trivial by any means but as far as impact on human health probably very, very small. that's as things stand now, randi. could things get worse? perhaps. it looks like things are getting better overall in terms of control at these reaktdors. but if the amount of radiation went up, if the dispersion went up, if more people were affected, obviously all of those health concerns would change. but as things stand now, certainly in japan outside the e ev evacuation zone and even more
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certainly across the ocean in the united states, the fears, concerns about radiation causing an impact on human health, very, very low. randi, back to you. >> sanjay, thank you very much. to find out how you can help victims of the japanese earthquake and tsunami, go to impact your world at cnn.com/impaktd. we have all the information there, in case you do want to help out. another u.s. ally in the fight against al qaeda could be on the verge of civil war. the latest on the crisis in yemen. n... and it goes out into the world like fuel for the economy. one opportunity leading to another... and another. we all have a hand in it. because opportunity can start anywhere, and go everywhere. let's keep it moving. ♪ hostcould switching to geico 15% or more on car insurance?
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40 minutes past the hour. the small northern african country of yemen has played a key role in the u.s. fight against al qaeda. what's concerning washington right now is that yemen may be on the verge of civil war. that was the warning today from yemen's longtime president. it came after president ali abdullah saleh said he would step down at the beginning of next year. the opposition's response was quick. saleh has one option -- leave right now without delay. if he fails to do so, the opposition vowed to continue street demonstrations like this one today in the capital. all of this comes after a number of high-level officials, including a senior military commander, switched sides to the opposition. the defecting general has ordered his troops to protect dmon strators but there are growing signs of a dangerous split in the military. the defense minister says the armed forces remain loyal to the president. in egypt today, trouble for a country that only recently enjoyed a mostly peaceful
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revolution. a huge fire broke out at the interior ministry building in downtown cairo. it happened after a peaceful demonstration. cnn's ivan wattson joins us from cairo. ivan, any word on how this fire started? >> reporter: we just got off the phone, randi, with the spokesman for the interior ministry. and he suggested that it may have been caused by an electrical malfunction on one of the top floors and that a lot of uniforms and pieces of furniture that were stored there are a part of the reason why the fire spread so quickly. kind of difficult to believe, he said the investigation should be wrapped up by tomorrow and they'll release some further information, but this is the second very suspicious blaze to hit the interior ministry here in just 30 days and coming right after demonstrations right outside this building. >> ivan, we talked a lot during the revolution and the protests there in tahrir square that you
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were covering about this building. tell us again why it's so significant and how it's related to the police force. >> reporter: well, part of the revolution here is because egypt was a police state, and much of those law enforcement barties and secret police who had been so effective at breaking up dissent and peaceful opposition protests were managed out of the interior ministry, the headquarters of the police apparatus. now, when the famous images of the tahrir square protests began, there were also very close to tahrir square demonstrators trying to get close to this building andrew teenly were shot up by those inside. we saw people being pulled out with bullet wounds, buckshot wounds, hour after hour, deadly clashes taking place there. now we see the suspicious fire
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erupting right after thousands of police officers were holding what had been a peaceful but kind of angry protest right outside the walls of the building. they were demanding higher wages, randi. >> are there important records in there that they might have wanted to destroy, someone plight have wanted to? >> reporter: right next to the main headquarters of this fortified building is the criminal records building, randi. and when the first fire -- and i witnessed it about 30 days ago here. there had been this other demonstration there of interior ministry employees and somebody tried to set fire to the front of the criminal records building. and there was a lot of rumors afterwards that perhaps people inside were trying to burn some of the criminal records, some of the files lech s left, by this state, perhaps destroy incriminating evidence. we don't know what's behind that. what is clear is this country is still politically far from
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stable about a month and a half after its longtime dictatoryial president was overthrown. >> ivan watson for us in cairo. ivan, thank you. 44 minutes past the hour. taking a look now at our top stories. the u.s. military says an american war plane crashed in libya today after experiencing equipment malfunction. the pilot and weapons officer ejected safely and both are now out of libya. officials say the f-15 strike eagle had known to libya from italy. in japan, workers succeeded in restoring power to the control room of one of the reactors at the earthquake damaged nuclear plant. the next step is repair the water pumps to cool the reactors. in syria, antigovernment protesters took to the streets again today. we're told these pictures show people who were injured in clashes with security forces over the weekend. we haven't been able to confirm this report. protestors are demanding greater
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freedom and an end to corruption. the country has been under emergency laws for nearly 50 years. powering your car may soon be safer, cheaper, and even better for the environment. it is today's "big i," coming up right after this break.
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the disaster in japan has
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refocused the world's attention on nuclear energy. several hydrogen explosions have occurred at the nuclear power plant in northern japan putting people at risk for radiation poisoning. normally when we think of these hydrogen explosions we think of what you see there on your screen, mixing hydrogen and oxygen together can be highly flammable. so while it's a great form of energy, it can also be very dangerous if not used properly. but we do want to point out that most all of the energy used in this country can be dangerous, including the gasoline you put in your car. so let's talk for a minute about how it's used when it's correctly. nasa uses hydrogen to power the space shuttle, the only byproduct of hydrogen power is water. astronauts drink that water. today there are 300 vehicles on the road powered by hydrogen. so how do we fix the problem of the hydrogen/oxygen dangerous mix? we have a possible solution in today's "big i." the department of energy has made a breakthrough when it comes to transporting and
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storing the gas. here to tell us about that is jeff urban, he works as a lead scientist at the berkeley lab. he has a title i will tell you as long as my arm so we'll just call jeff a super smart guy. that's your new title for today. >> fair enough. >> great to have you with us. tell us about this big breakthrough. >> yeah, this really came out of a big dilemma in the hydrogen storage community, which is how do you safely and densely hold on to a large quantity of hydrogen, something that you'd need to power a vehicle. as you mengtioned but also do a you say release the fuel when you want to on demand and in quantities that you'd like to. what we did is we basically engineered a material for which we could take advantage of the intrinsically faster kinetics of really small crystals, nanocrystals in this case. but by working with them in such a way that they're encased or
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embedded in a gas-selective polymer such that they can be dealt with very safely, just allowing the hydrogen to go in and out but protecting them from oxygen and water and other chemicals. >> so in really simple terms, terms that even i'll be able to understand here, because i'm not a scientist, what does it mean for the folks at home? >> what it means is i think we now have a strategy and there's a materials design plan to developing ways to safely and productively use hydrogen as a carrier for energy. i'm excited about it. i think it's a big event because historically one has either only been able to hold on to a very small density of hydrogen, such that you couldn't really power a car for 300 miles, which is kind of the benchmark, or else you would really need to pump very high temperatures or very high pressures to release it. and that's just not practical for working on your everyday vehicles. >> so when it comes to hydrogen myths, can you help us dispel
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some of them? how safe really is this energy? >> well, i think you really nail td 0 at the outset. any energy carrier, any fuel has intrinsic dangers. hydrogen, i'm excited about it, because it has a lot of potential benefits. in contrast to gasoline, which we're all familiar with, hydrogen is intrinsically nontoxic and it doesn't pool on the ground, it doesn't accumulate in that way. it's 15 times less dense than air. and it has very clean byproducts, as you mentioned, any of the sort of traditional fuels that we work with day to day, whether it's powering our car or even have egg little butane lighter in our pocket, they have dangers that we really to a large degree don't think about anymore because we have great safety regulations in place. probably the biggest dangers in cars nowadays is user error. >> jeff urban, thank you for making it so easy. we told everybody you were a super smart guy and it certainly sounds like it. you proved us right.
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>> thank you. >> thank you. to check out jeff's research, head to cnn.com/ali. we'll also link you up to the department of energy's hydrogen info web site if you want to dig on this some more. whether you believe that global warming is a natural cycle of the planet or manmade, it's proving to be a problem for this lovely planet of ours. this week, our special correspondent and environmentalist felipe cousteau and his team is heading to one of the coldest places on earth as part of a vital expedition. joining an elite group of scientists planning to conduct research into global warming. today is day one. they're currently in resolute bay in the northern canadian arctic. after a day of training, the expedition will makity way to the ice base where temperatures dip to a very chilly 40 degrees below zero. every year scientists head to the ice base to conduct gloek warming research. the ice base is about 675 nautical miles from the north pole.
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so to read felipe cousteau's day one blog, head to ali's blog cnn.com/ali and we'll also link you up to the catland arctic survey as well. check this out. this is something you have to see. a human space shuttle. 2,000 workers at the kennedy space center in florida gathered in the parking lot to create that huge spacecraft you see there. this is time-lapse video of the creation. they didn't to it that fast. it was done in honor of the space program this past friday. there are two final shuttle launches planned for the program, just two. the weapons of war. want to know what the u.s. is using in operation odyssey dawn? we'll break down the big pieces, next. [ female announcer ] right now he's not thinking
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about his future. he can't say social security... much less tell you what it means. he doesn't know that his parents are counting on the money they pay in. or that the hard earned benefits his grandparents receive... are secure. right now he's not thinking about his future. but we are. aarp has been working to preserve social security for more than 50 years. join us in a conversation to strengthen it for years to come.
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with our focus on the military operations in libya and the u.s. involvement, we wanted to take a moment to talk about
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some of the weaponry being used in operation odyssey dawn. so let's start with the american f-15 strike eagle. this is it right here. it goes about 1875 miles per hour, can fly at a low altitude day or night, really in any kind of weather. now, that is the plane that went down in libya. both crew members, as we've been telling you this afternoon, are safe. as you can see, the strike eagle flies at low altd attitude as works in all kinds of weather. it's also very well armed. next, the tomahawk cruise missiles. you can see it's pretty fast traveling at 550 miles per hour. it's normally programmed on the ship before being fired. the u.s. fired 20 of them into libya in the last 18 or so hours. a total of 159 tomahawks have been fired into libya by the u.s. since the operation first began saturday. it carries about 1,000 pounds of explosionives. the missiles are being fired from american navy ships in the mediterranean, including the "uss barry," one of two guided
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missile destroyers there. here is a look at it, about 500 feet long, 346,000 officers on board, the u.s. also had three submarines in the mediterranean firing cruise missiles but one hooz since left the area. finally, let's show you and talk a bit about the "uss mt mt. whitney." this is the command and control ship for the u.s. navy's sixth fleet. the crew about 700 or so, carries on board guns, rockets. it'ses the command center for the coordinated operation going on right now. liaisons from the other coalition partners are also on board. and the u.s. admiral samuel locklear is operating odyssey dawn from this very ship, the mt. whitney. allied air strikes are still inflicting damage on the military assets of moammar gadhafi in libya but not without a cost. you're looking at the wreckage now of a u.s. f-15 that crashed today in rebel-held eastern
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libya, for reasons the u.s. military says were technical, not hostile. i'll say that again for you. the u.s. says the plane had equipment problems and was not shot down. at this point, libyan air defenses are said to be minimal at most. the jet's two-man crew was ejected and the pilot was rescued prompt lly by the u.s. the weapons officer was found by libyan rebels who took care of him until americans could reach him. neither man is badly hurt. back in tripoli, reporters saw the result of an allied strike on a port. we'll get more on that in just a moment. we also have remarkable pictures from misrata, a city down the coast that gadhafi forces have bombarded for days now. this is amateur video uploaded to youtubed yesterday. we can't confirm when or where it was shot but we do know
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misrata's main hospital reports 77 deaths since sunday. the u.n.-approved campaign to protect libyan civilians began on saturday and it's still not clear really who ae's even goino end up in charge. arab states don't want to work for nato and the u.s. has other campaigns to worry about. nato says it will enforce a libyan arms embargo in the meantime. let's bring in chris lawrence from pentagon and arwa damon is in benghazi. chris, let's start with you. bring us up-to-date on the no-fly zone if you will. >> it's starting to get established around the area of benghazi and the goal is to start pushing it west. you know, through those other cities all the way eventually out to tripoli. if you take a look at the graphic, you can see what's been decided upon. they have decided to enforce basically a northern no-fly zone just over the northern tip of the country. burr enforcing it could become tricky as the weeks go on
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because some of the commanders, u.s. military commanders, say they've already started to see some of the rebels with heavy armor, bigger weapons. and the question becomes, once they are armed like that, some commanders say they don't necessarily still fall under the protecting civilians clause and if they start to advance on gadhafi's forces, that could present a very challenging problem for the coalition. >> and why did the coalition, chris, choose this particular plan in terms of focusing on the coastal areas? >> u.s. pentagon officials told me basically when you look at a country the size, the sheer size, of libya, you've got to put your assets where they count the most. and really across that north is the most populated center. it's also a matter of money. to enforce a no-fly zone over the entire country could be upwards of $300 million, whereas enforcing it over just the northern strip probably more in the range of just under $100 million. >> we've been getting a lot of
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comments, chris, on the blog about the cost of this in no-fly zone and protecting the libyans. i know you said it's over $1 million per tomahawk missile? >> yeah. the navy puts the number, when you take all the cost associated with it, at about $1.4 million per missile. we know there's been about 160 of them fired. some of them british but, say the u.s. has fired 130 of them. that's $182 million, just on the tomahawks alone. and then when you look -- when they start to decrease in use, then the jets start to pick up in use, and the cost to keep, say, an f-15 fighter in the air for an hour is about $10,000. >> chris, thanks for that. arwa, let's get to you. tell us about the rebel rescue. we've been talking about this f-15 that went down, and the rebel fighters actually rescued one of the airmen. >> reporter: yeah, randi.
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we were down at the scene of that crash just a short while ago where residents and eyewitnesss in the area, which is around an hour's drive east of benghazi, fields, farmlands, residents in that area tell williing us they realized there was a fighter jet overhead, they assumed it was foreign, and that the crew would be in need of help. so the entire area went out and began combing through these fields and farmlands looking for the crew because they wanted to help them, realizing that the crew was flying over libya basically to help and protect the population. we spoke with one colonel who was just about the only english speaker there who said that he was shouting at whoever could hear him to come out, that they would be safe, that they were in friendly territory, not enemy territory. one of the pilots, he said, eventually came out and the colonel described that in his gratitude he walked over, hugged this pilot, kissed him on both cheeks. said the pilot appeared by and
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large unharmed, a bit dazed. they did begin chitchatting about mundane things, talking about their families, the colonel remarking that the pilot was one of his son's ages. everyone in this area expressing their gratitude because people here do firmly believe that without foreign intervention, without those air strikes, they would all have eventually been massacred by gadhafi's forces, randi? >> you can only imagine how relieved these men were when they landed in rebel friendly territory and to see them rescued by the opposition forces they're there actually trying to help as well. so thank you, arwa, for that report and to chris lawrence as well. it is just after 2:00 a.m. wednesday in japan, and workers at the fukushima daiichi nuclear plant finally have something to celebrate. the crisis is by no means over, but today they restored electricity to the control room of the number three reactor, one of four devastated by explosions, fires or both. and electricity, of course, means a lot. it can power water pumps after
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they're repaired as well as lights, ventilation and monitoring systems. crews still are spraying water ofrn reactors three and four and scientists still testing water, air and soil for miles around. we told you about the bans on local milk and produce. well, today high levels of radioactive iodine and cesium were found in soil 25 miles from the plant. the official death toll from japan's catastrophic earthquake and tsunami now stands at 9,080 with 13,561 still considered missing. one of those in one category or another is a grandfather who thought he'd be safe in his own bedroom. cnn's gary tuchman met his family. >> reporter: this woman lost her bridal shop in katsunuma, japan, but that's the least of her worries because she can't find
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her father. >> translator: maybe he's home. maybe he's still in the house. >> reporter: her mother evacuated before the tsunami, but her father, 79-year-old sato, said he would be safe on the second floor of his home so he stayed behind. so why doesn't shekako kn o kno he survived? >> translator: there's no way to get there. >> reporter: incredibly, this part of the city has been so utterly pulverized there are impenetrable mountains of rubble. firefighters couldn't get to the house to search for satsu sato. we couldn't believe there wasn't some way to get there so shitako's son started walking with us toward the neighborhood. but as the size and scope of the wreckage got more intense, he went looking for firefighters who could help and we continued the journey. we were still nowhere near the house when we made a discovery. the carnage we're seeing is horrifying. as you know, the number of people on the missing lo ining very high. one of the missing is in the back seets of this car.
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we see the body of a man who apparently drowned in the tsunami. we saw firefighters combing wreckage and we notified them so soldiers could remove the body. we also told them all what we were trying to do. but the firefighters were not able to find a way to get there either. 48 hours have now gone by since we first arrived and we see that firefighters have cut a path. we can walk through this muddy swamp and we think we'll be able to get to the house. and then we see it, the home a half mile from where it used to be. the first floor is destroyed. but the second floor is intact. however, there is no sign of human life. no sign of satsuo sato. if he had stayed here, it's appear he could have survived of the the linens still in place. up here, a judo class picture. the grandson is in the picture. we don't know what happened to his grandfather. shikako had been informed by authorities that her father was not in the house.
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we retrieved sentimental mementos from his bedroom for her. and she told us -- >> translator: others have been found. survivors have been in the news so i still have some hope. >> reporter: sat dsuo sat assis now one of the names on thes list of the missing. a u.s. air force fighter jet crashes in libya because of mechanical problems. how was the u.s. military able to come to the rescue so quickly? i'll ask a former nato supreme allied commander. and we want to know what you think p about the u.s. involvement in libya. send us your thoughts. here's how to reach us at twitter, facebook and our blog. we'll read your answers in just a few minutes so keep it here. ♪
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basic. preferred. at meineke i have options on oil changes. and now i get free roadside assistance with preferred or supreme. my money. my choice. my meineke. can you hear that? that's and tie aircraft fire piercing the night guy in tripoli. as we mentioned a little earlier, the military says a u.s. air force fighter jet crashed because of mechanical problems. both crew members ejected safely and are now in u.s. hands. i want to bring in general wesley clark. general clark, glad you're with us. when something like this happens with that crash, what is the rescue process? can you walk us through how these guys were picked up so quickly? how the military would handle this? >> during thiez missiese missios
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always standby crews usually with helicopters or v-22 ausprys, who know where the planes are headed. they know when they're going in. they're ready to goe if they have to penetrate to pick someone up. they also have a package of other aircraft that help them get in there. so this is a play -- it's a drill that's practiced again and again, talked through on chalk boards, practiced live and so forth so they know exactly how to package the rescue asset to go in, even in hostile territory. then the crew is flying, it's being tracked by radar, someone's flight-following it. if they have a problem, they're on radio communications. if they have to aeject, when thy eject, the last location is known. the pilots have radio communications on the ground. they know what to do. they're told where to scatter to, so forth. this is all practiced out.
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>> let's talk about the mixed messages from the obama administration and the pentagon. take a listen to what defense secretary robert gates said in russia today and we'll talk about it right after. >> there hasn't been any disagreement that i'm aware of in terms of the mission and what we're trying to accomplish. at least in terms of the security council resolution. you know, this is a complicated -- this command and control business is complicated. we haven't done something like this, kind of on the fly, before so it's not surprising to me that it would take a few days to get it all sorted out. >> so, general, yesterday we had the president reiterating that gadhafi has to go but then the pentagon saying he's really not the target of these air strikes. so what is the end game? >> well, i think the end game politically for the administration is to leverage gadhafi out of libya. that is certainly the end game
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for the rebels, who apparently don't want any discussion or negotiation with gadhafi. but that's not the military mission. the military mission is to protect innocent civilians, and that's the authorization of the u.n. security council and that's the mission the u.s. is executing. >> and there is criticism of the administration for not having a clear plan. how would you define this mission? do you see a clear plan here? >> well, i think there's a clear military plan. the question is, does it lead to a decisive political outcome? and saying that we want gadhafi out, if that's the objective, that's a decisive political outcome. you may not be happy with it after it's over because the libyans will still have to form a constitution and get a government in place and so forth. the difficulty is that the military objective when it's accomplished doesn't necessarily lead to the political objective that's being sought. this is what's puzzling to people on the outside.
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now, it may be that this is a stroke of brilliance. it might work out anyway just by providing the u.s. and coalition air cover may be enough to discourage gadhafi. he's lost two sons reportedly so far, and his effort might fall apart. the rebels might take over and everything would be happy. people would say, boy, it was a genius of a plan. on the other hand, it may result in a stalemate it's too early to know. >> but if he's still in power after this operation odyssey, won't somebody still have to tighten the noose on the libyan leader at some point, maybe send in some ground troops? >> well, there are different ways to tighten the noose, and i think when you're in an operation like this, if the u.s. objective is to get rid of gadhafi, then you have to use all elements of power, not just military but economic, diplomatic and legal to go after gadhafi. >> all right, general wesley clark. appreciate your insight today. thank you. >> thank you. earlier we asked you for your thoughts on the u.s. involvement in libya. here's what you told us.
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we said we were going to share some of them. on gafacebook -- i think it's the moral obligation of all countries to help those in need. i i am glad we're taking a big role in protecting the civilians of libya. then doug -- we have plenty to take care of at home. it's a waste of money when we have none to waste. on our blog, william -- we shouldn't be helping libyans. these are the same libyans who welcomed home as a hero the pan am bomber. pick a side, any side, one is at bad as the other. this one -- as a libyan, i think what the u.s. is doing or trying to do is very helpful. seeing my family and friends die, i say we need all the hem we can get. it thanks so much for your thoughts. confused by the new guidelines for putting kids in car seats? well, dr. sanjay gupta is going to sort it all out for you. your favorite big g cereals. m from cheerios to lucky charms, there's whole grain in every box. make sure to look for the white check.
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welcome back. it is not much of a view, but american children are going to spend more time facing their car's back seat. the american academy of pe pediatrics has decided children should ride in rear-facing car seats until they're 2 years old, a year longer than under the previous guidelines. cnn chief medical correspondent dr. sanjay gupta has details for us. >> reporter: well, there's some new recommendations coming out of the american academy of
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pediatrics about car seats and children up until the age of 2, or until they exceed the height and weight restrictions on the rear-facing car seat, should stay in one of them. it was previously 1 year, 20 pound pounds. this is mikey, 23 months. he is in a rear-facing car seat. this is exactly what the academy says should be happening. now, this is based on a lot of data actually showing that car seats that are facing the rear are. safer. parents are better than ever about keeping their kids in car seats and the number of deaths in car accidents in children have gone down as a result. what they're saying is, if there's an accident, the force is sort of distributed across the body as opposed to just on the head here in rear-facing car seats. that's what they say makes all the difference. so mikey should be in a rear-facing car seat. children up to 4'9" should be in a booster seat. and they say children 13 and under should always sit in the
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rear seat. now, kids are aren't always going to be happy about this. you can see this here possibly. but they say it's much safer and they say it f a child has actually started sitting in a front seat but it doesn't meet the guidelines, they should actually switch back. one of the things you may notice here is the legs may be a little squished, especially if a child is tall. you can buy bigger rear-facing car seats. they say typically if a child has not switched already to a front-facing car seat they're really not going to be too bothered by it. mikey doesn't seem too bothered by it. some new recommendations coming ouflt the american academy of pediatrics hopefully providing additional safety for a lot of children out there. back to you. >> thanks, sanjay. little mikey, his young assistant, the one who demonstrated the car seat so nicely for us, was mikey fernad, one of the writers here's sons. workers to prevent a melt
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down at fukushima daiichi. they've restored power to the number three reactor. >> the next step is restoring air conditioning so workers can go inside and get the reactor's cooling sx working again. two u.s. airmen are safe after their fighter jet crashed in libya today. the pentagon blames mechanical problems, not enemy fire. both airmen eject as the jet was going down. they suffered only minor injuries. a u.s. team picked up the pilot, rebels found the other airmen and turned him over to coalition forces. an investigation is under way into today's fire at the egyptian ministry building in cairo. a spokesman says on electrical malfunction may be the cause. the building was the site of a demonstration today by ministry workers command demander higher pay but they deny setting the fire. chad myers joins us next for a troubling update on where winds in japan may blow the radiation next.
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welcome back. chad myers here. you have news on wind and wildfires in the u.s. >> winds blowing 40 to 50 miles per hour through kansas, oklahoma, colorado and texas. >> wow! >> you get one spark and you're going to get a fire. i've been on the phone now for the past 10, 15 minutes with johnson, kansas. not johnson county but to the west there is a fire on the ground and they are very
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concerned for the town. especially concerned for the western part of the town. but i have been on the phone with the emergency managers and they are evacuating some people. you say, why did you just put the radar up? does that mean it's raining? this smoke is so thick that the radar from dodge city, almost 100 miles away, thinks it's raining out there. that's -- >> so that's what it's picking up. >> the particles in the sky, could be rain, could be hail, could be snow. the particles in the sky right there, smoke. amazing to see it this far away. usually we see it in oklahoma city and it's a couple miles away. you can see the smoke on the radar swell vel. when you can see it that far, you know this is a blazing fire. that's southwestern kansas, right about there, because of the wind and potential for those wildfires to keep going today. one more thing to talk about. >> sure. >> tornado watch going to be posted for kansas city, almost oklahoma, into omaha, nebraska. the potential for storms that could spin. watch means it could happen,
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warning means it is happening. it only means right now it could happen. then your tease that you talked about. >> wanted to make sure we asked you about because of the winds in japan. >> correct. you think to yourself, why do i care about winds in japan? radiation goes everywhere. yes, but radiation also clings to other particles like dust and humidity and moisture. if you get that into a cloud and you push that cloud one way or the other, then you push the radiation as well and all of the arrows at least blowing for today and tomorrow slightly offshore but a slight change in the direction would take it right into tokyo. and this is only -- this only goes out until tomorrow night. when we get into thursday or friday, certainly the potential -- if you see an arrow like that, if it points that way, that is a bad omen for anybody in japan because that's where the people live. the people right here along this spine here, anywhere from tokyo. we talk about tokyo a lot with 17 million or more people. there are more people in japan than in california in almost the
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same landmass. a lot of people compacted together. >> the last thing we need is wind blowing the radiation around. chad, take a look at this, the egyptian interior ministry in downtown cairo today. on fire. >> i think that is the facade. i think that is like fake stuck co-synthetic stucco, burning there because it's on the outside of the building so much. maybe not as much damage to the inside as you might think. >> quite a scene, though. the dramatic scene, what sparked it, we'll have details next.
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now some other stories you may have missed. in libya, the latest word is
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moammar gadhafi forces are still attack being the town of misrata. these attacks after a u.s. fighter jet crashed in libya today east of misrata. the military says both crew members ejected after a malfunction. the pilot and weapons officer are both safe and suffered minor injuries. some positive news out of japan and fukushima daiichi. the workers have finally restored power to the control room inside reactor three, which has been a top priority as you know in recent days. this latest development is a key victory. one step forward toward getting the reactors' cooling systems back online. in the meantime, a faint trail of smoke is still rising from the plant, p bbut the main concern shifts to reactors one and two. tokyo electric's president says the damage to those two reactors is worse than they thought. the cause is unclear, but seawater may be corroding and damaging the reagentor's core.
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repairs are going to take a bit longer. with every passing day, rescue workers are uncovering more bodies. the dead now is more than 9,000 with nearly 14,000 people still missing. meanwhile, the concerns over japan's nuclear crisis is spreading beyond its borders with tests showing radiation in the ocean. tokyo electric says they found high levels of radiation in sea water near the plant but results were not a threat to people's health. work hes are monitoring water and food sources nearby, but the radiation is clearly spreading. here in the u.s. traces were detected in seattle, but health deptd wo department workers say the levels are extremely low and pose no health risk to anyone. this is the egyptian interior ministry, downtown cairo. take a look at that fire. it was following a protest earlier. you can see the flames on the roof, a massive plume of smoke. people were seen running from the building when this was all happening. moments before this, thousands of ministry employees were
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protesting for higher wages. a ministry spokesman just issued a statement saying he expects an electrical circuit malfunction may have sparked the fire. one of the greatest players in the nfl will now be known as a registered sex offender. lawrence taylor pled guilty to charges he had sex with an underage prostitute last may. the nfl hall of fame linebacker was sentenced today to six years of probation and fined $2,000. the nightmare of combat, disturbing pictures of afghan dead and their alleged link to american soldiers. we'll have details right after this.
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in the u.s. civil war, the union general william sherman famously said war is hell. two horrible examples, the milay massacre during vietnam and the abu ghraib prison. now these pictures appear to show two american soldiers in afghanistan posing over the bodies of afghan civilians. the soerds alleged to be involved are currently facing charges for killing civilians and mutilating their bodies. joining to talk about this, cnn international anchor michael holmes. whoo do you expect the fallout to be? >> the photographs are terrible. the other ones that you see, they're holding the head of one of the dead young farm boys up by the hair and smiling at the camera. these are the sorts of photographs. the fallout, of course, is like we saw when we had abu ghraib and situations like that. the fallout could be
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considerable, certainly a potential for more tension between the u.s. and the afghan government, which is already widely complaining about civilian deaths in air strikes. also, provides propaganda ammunition for the taliban, working out there to persuade afghans that the international forces are the bad guys. those sorts of photographs are obviously just great ammunition for the taliban. >> no idea how the magazine got them. >> no, i don't know. and they got more apparently. they've got a lot more, they say. so there could be more of this coming out. now, this was all part of the evidence against the guys who are now facing charges like murder and part of the evidence brief so obviously it's leaked somewhere along the line. but those charges are still going ahead. >> we also want to talk a little bit about syria. we've been reporting on the unrest in syria. it's been overshadowed so much by libya, but antigovernment protestors seem to be stepping up their demonstrations over
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what they say are years of abuse. >> reporter: for six days, people in the southern city of daraa have taken to the streets. it began as a protest against the detention of more than 30 children, some as young as 10, who had written graffiti. the protestors who claim corruption and hardship, human rights groups say people have been killed so far, most of them shot friday by security forces. this video uploaded to youtube was apparently shot at a funeral in daraa saturday. the unrest has since spread to towns near daraa, an important agricultural center close to the boerdor with jordan. on monday, video was posted on youtube apparently showing a protest in ankle where a crowd shouted, after today, no fear. president bashar al assad has in
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some ways opened autopsy a country tightly controlled by his father, allowing greater economic freedom and access to the internet. but the regime's tolerance of dissent is limited. its extensive security forces often in plainclothes have moved in quickly. this cell phone video apparently showing the arrest of a woman protestor. >> we condemn the violence by the syrian government that caused the deaths and injuries of individuals who protested over the past week and we call on the syrian government to exercise restraint and refrain from violence against the peaceful protestors. >> reporter: the u.s. has few options to influence events in syria, but they seem to be acquiring a momentum of their own. with widespread protests being called for friday on facebook and other social media. michael, you say you're actually surprised to see this happening in syria. >> yeah, i am. syria was one of a couple of countries in the region where you'd say, yeah, it's not going to happen there, not going to happen there yet. it's going to take a long time. to see those sorts of
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demonstrations in the streets in syria, they've got a regime there that will brutally repress any hint of opposition. and they're very brave, these guys, to be out there. but it's like the fear barrier gets broken and then it gets a roll on its own. with that happening in syria where they've been under repression for decades, it's very significant. >> i also want to talk about libya. we talked about this u.s. war plane that crashed there, mechanical errors, today. and one of the airmen on board was rescued by the opposition forces, which had a lot of us wondering, who is the opposition? >> well, it's a whole bunch of different people. there is a national transitional council that's been set up. basically, it's an umbrella group of various opposition figures but also a lot of regular professionals, people like doctors and lawyers and academics and the like. and they talk about democracy and transparency and the rule of law and all of those things that we like to hear about in the west here. and so they are basically a
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government in waiting, if you like, and basing out of benghazi in the east. but of course when it or if it comes to a point where they need to move into power or something we keep talking about the opposition so it's interesting to hear a little more detail about that. we're going to continue the discussion a little bit longer about libya. the roller coaster relationship between gadhafi and the west spans decades. next, carl adzuz breaks down gadhafi's rule in times of conflict and peace. [ male announcer ] this is charlie whose morning flight
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libyan leader moammar gadhafi is outspoken and flamboyant and many in the west have a vision of libya without him. carl azuz is looking at the reasons why in today's big breakdown. how long have the tensions existed, really for decades, right? >> exactly. pretty much since gadhafi came into power, relations with the west started going south. he sees himself as this great visionary, this revolutionary, that's a viewpoint not shared by many even in the middle east. few tacts about gadhafi. he has been in power for decade,
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42 years as libya's leader. when he came in, he had this idea of a state of the masses, a form of direct democracy. but in actuality, the uscia says it has become an authoritarian state with gadhafi as the authority. one other thing i want you to know is he has sought broader leadership in africa. he never saw himself limited to libya. this is snb who summoned in 2008 roughly 200 african rulers to a meeting and had them dub him king of ding kings. he's also fancied himself as a regional power. >> a bit of a climber, i guess. >> yes. >> let's talk about this roller coaster of a relationship he's had with the west. he's had support, then he hasn't had support. it's kind of gone back and forth. >> it has. it really goes back to when he came in. he has encouraged muslims to take up arms against the west over the decades. he's been in power, libya was implicated. he backed terrorism in the '70s and '80 dz, libya being
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implicated in a lockerbie bombing and a nightclub that killed an american. then things changed in the late '90s, trying to improve relations with the west. he turned over some lockerbie suspects that the international community wanted. he also eliminated weapons of mass destruction. >> that was a big deal, a really big deal, when president bush was in the white house. >> right. relations improved for a while with the bush administration in effect in the u.s. but then things took another southern turn, 2008 his son was arrested in switzerland so gadhafi responded by cutting off switzerland's oil supplies. theb in 20 oin into tl was a lockerb lockerbie, convicted lockerbie bomber released early for health reasons. he came back to libya and gadhafi's government gave him a hero's welcome. there has been up and down with the west but more down. >> it's interesting. i was talking to michael holmes about his supporters. he keeps talking about his supporters but he really doesn't have any besides those
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protecting him and his family-that's right. he's sought to become this regional, dominant force, but there are people, particularly people in the arab world, who sort of see him as a loose cannon and certainly america has historically seen him as a terrorist. it's very difficult for him to get that status he has sought. >> carl, very good insight. thank you. >> thank you. the u.s. taking a lead role in libya, but should the u.s. really be playing any role at all? we're going to debate this, next.
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with our focus on the military operations in libya and the u.s. involvement, we wanted to take a moment to talk about some of the weaponry that's being used in operation odyssey dawn. so let's start with the american f-15 strike eagle. there's a shot of it right there. that is the plane that actually went down today. it can fly at low altitudes, works in all kinds of weather and is also very well armed. next, let me show you the tomahawk cruise missiles. you can see it's pretty fast, traveling 550 miles per hour or so. it's normally programmed on the ship before being fired. the u.s. fired 20 of them into
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libya in the last 18 or so hours. these were actually first launched operationally during operation desert storm. a total of 159 tomahawks have been fired into libya by the u.s. since the operation began on saturday. the missiles are being fired from american navy ships in the mediterranean, that includes this one here, the "uss barry" one of two guided missile destroyers there. the u.s. also had three submarines in the mediterranean firing cruise missiles. this has more than 346,000 officers on board. meanwhile, one of those ships have left the area. let's talk about the "uss mt. whet ne mt. mt. whitney." it's the command center for the coordinated operation going on right now. it has a crew of about 700. it has guns and rockets on board. liaisons from the other coalition partners are also on board.
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u.s. admiral samuel locklear is administrating odyssey dawn from this very ship. the united states has taken a lead role in operation odyssey dawn, now officials are saying the u.s. is going to kind of pull back and let someone take the lead. but the question remains -- should the u.s. be involved at all? here's senator richard lugar's take. >> i do not understand the mission because, as far as i can tell, in the united states there is no mission. there are no guidelines for success. that may well be true with our allies, although conceivably they may have other missions in mind and simply trying to get security council clearance to proceed. >> today we're putting the question to our "stream team." should the u.s. be involved at all? from los angeles, richard gra nell, former u.s. spokesman for the united nations, in washington, jed babben, former und und undersecretary of against. jed, let me start with you. should the u.s., in your
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opinion, be leading this operation in libya? >> well, couple of things to that. number one, we shouldn't be involved at all. there is no interest sufficient in libya to justify risking american lives and employing our military there. if we are going to do it, i guess we're going to have to be in command because the way we have our assets set up and the fact that we have so many of different kinds really means there's nobody else who can do it. unless you have ships like "mt. whitney," you have awax, j-stars, variety of assets and aircraft, it's hard for anybody else to do it. i don't think the brits or french can do it. they certainly can't sustain it for very long even if they could. >> richard, let me ask you your take on that. >> you know, it's interesting because the obama administration finds itself in a huge dilemma. in an attempt to try to be all things to all people, they have really been successful in making everybody angry at them. the left and the right. they came into this trying to
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slow the process down. the u.n. absolutely took the lead, the french took the lead. the french were actually trying to convince us. by the time the obama team stopped dithering and figured out, okay, we should support this nishltive, it was almost too late because everybody was angry. the fact is, the u.s. military will always be in lead just by sheer expertise and knowledge and power. but the french started this diplomacy, and they were in the lead on the diplomatic side, and the u.s. was very far behind. so the two are not going to be equal just simply because our diplomatic leaders didn't really know what they were doing and by the time our military came in, of course they always take control. and i think as obama says it's going to be a short stay and our military will back off and our diplomacy is going to have to play catch-up. >> just to be clear, you're okay with the u.s. being there, just really how the president handled it? >> i think we absolutely should
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have been there. we should have been out front in the lead role. when you have a country like libya that the opposition is gaining control over a madman and pushing back, it's clear that we have to stand and help democracy and human rights no matter where it's found. let me move on here. in terms of the end game, we seem to be getting mixed messages we're talking about. obama yesterday reiterating that gadhafi has to go but the pentagon saying he's not the target ever the air strikes, that he could even remain in power after all of this. what do you say to that, jed? >> well, i this there's a lot of fog of war and most of it is coming out of the white house right dmou. we don't really know what the objective is. admiral mullen and the president have said, we're there for humanitarian purposes. we're not out to get gadhafi. the french are out there being french and disagreeing and doing what they're going to do. but the basic point here is, if we're not going to get gadhafi -- again, i do not believe we should be involved at all -- we're effectively saying he can stay under certain
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circumstances. to me, that proposes an enormous and indefinite stay there. i don't believe we can be there for very long. the assets we're ploying there are badly needed in afghanistan -- in the world. this is an open-ended commitment the president has made. it's extremely unwise. >> what do you think of dennis kucinich saying obama actions are impeachable? >> it's a ridiculous statement. but he's very consistent at least. the simple fact is, the white house has made a very clear octoberive. it's just everybody disagrees with the objective. those who wanted us to go in faster are mra complaining that we should be in regime change, that when we have a chance to go get a madman like gadhafi we should do it. didn't we learn our lesson from saddam hussein, that if you leave him in power it's only going to cost us billions of dollars, a lot of lives and a decade of wasting time? but the simple fact for the
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military crowd is, they're right. this is a very tough assignment. when we're stretched thin in iraq and afghanafghanistan. they want to focus there. >> guys, thank you. very interesting discussion. good to see you. a truly amazing finish in college sports this weekend and it had nothing at all to do with basketball. stick around. don't sweat it. i just switched us to sprint, so e-mail, web...on 4g... it's all unlimited. [ cellphone buzzes ] you just texted me to read the memo? unlimited text too. we really need you on this conference call. rick, it's lyle. rickster? i'm here. there he is! [ male announcer ] switch to sprint and get unlimited 4g data on a wide range of devices. sprint 4g, it's business without limits. trouble hearing on the phone? only on the now network. visit sprintrelay.com. how about a coastal soup and grilled shrimp salad combination at red lobster? or maybe skewers of tender, wood-grilled shrimp.
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time now for the "xyz" of
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it. while the sport world was focused on the ncaa basketball tournament over the weekend, a young man for arizona set a new standard. anthony robles, an arizona state university wrestler who defended the raining champ in his class. if that doesn't sound like a big deal to you, you should know that anthony was born without his right leg. so you can see why winning the ncaa wrestling championship is awe-inspir awe-inspiring. he first started wrestling at 14 in high school. sure he couldn't do it as well assed other guys, but he never stopped trying. in the last two years of high school, he went undefeated. his coach in as usaid he ran stadium stairs, runs track using his crutches. by the way, he runs an eight-minute mile. his missing leg

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